The 2014 Golden Helix Summer School was successfully organized in Aegina island, Greece, September 11-15, 2014. The meeting was attended by more than 100 participants and speakers from 21 countries worldwide, including Brazil, Japan, Saudi Arabia, South Africa and others. This event was co-organized by the Genomic Medicine Alliance and the Golden Helix Foundation and was the first of a series of similar educational events that will be organized in the future.

The participants enjoyed an intense scientific program on Phamacogenomics and Genomic Medicine and a social program that included a visit to the AFEA archaeological site (temple and museum), and a traditional BBQ and farewell party.

Please visit the 2014 Golden Helix Summer School website to access the photo gallery and downloads.

The DrugeVar database, an online database triangulating drugs with genes and pharmacogenomics biomarkers, is launched today. This database is a joint product of the Pharmacogenomics and Genome Informatics Working Groups and derived from the need to build a comprehensive database that could serve clinical pharmacogenomics. A user-friendly data querying and visualization interface allows users to formulate simple and complex queries. Such database would be readily applicable as a stand-alone resource or a plug-in module for other databases.

To access the DruGeVar database content, please click here.

The official journal of the Genomic Medicine Alliance is Public Health Genomics, published by Karger AG (Basel, Switzerland)

Public Health Genomics is the leading international journal focusing on the timely translation of genome-based knowledge and technologies into public health, health policies, and healthcare as a whole. This peer-reviewed journal is a bimonthly forum featuring original papers, reviews, short communications, and policy statements. It is supplemented by topic-specific issues providing a comprehensive, holistic and 'all-inclusive' picture of the chosen subject. Multidisciplinary in scope, it combines theoretical and empirical work from a range of disciplines, notably public health, molecular and medical sciences, the humanities and social sciences. In so doing, it also takes into account rapid scientific advances from fields such as systems biology, microbiomics, epigenomics or information and communication technologies as well as the hight potential of 'big data' for public health.

With an Impact Factor of 1.5 (2016), Public Health Genomics is one of the leading international journals in the field of Public Health Genomics and provides an ideal publication forum to members of the Genomic Medicine Alliance. Also, members of the Genomic Medicine Alliance are entitled to significant benefits and discounts not only to the journal's subscription and open access fees but also to Karger's books, such as:

  • Reduced annual subscription fees (149 CHF for online and 190 CHF for printed and online)
  • 10% discount on the Open Access Fee (Karger’s Author’s choice service)
  • 30% discount off the full price of Karger’s books

Pharmacogenomics aims to rationalize drug use by minimizing drug toxicity and/or by increasing drug efficacy. A large number of genomic variants have been correlated with variable drug response and severity of adverse drug reactions. Although a fraction of these drugs have been approved by regulatory agencies and comprehensive drug-gene lists exist online, information related to the respective pharmacogenomic biomarkers is currently missing from such lists. We have extracted information from the published literature and online resources and developed DruGeVar, an online database triangulating drugs with genes and pharmacogenomics biomarkers in an effort to build a comprehensive database that could serve clinical pharmacogenomics. A user-friendly data querying and visualization interface allows users to formulate simple and complex queries. Such database would be readily applicable as a stand-alone resource or a plug-in module for other databases. 

Enter Database

 

Thanks to the deep-sequencing technologies, the past decade has seen the characterization of nucleic acid alterations in a wide range of cancers generating a large body of information how cancer develops and evolves. Likewise genomic testing has moved from a research activity limited to specialized institutes, to a clinical test available in dozens of academic and commercial laboratories.

A new healthcare delivery model is evolving that uses a patient’s genomic information to guide treatment decisions. In this working group we will define and discuss some of the key terms and tools in genomic testing that primary care practitioners and specialists should know when dealing with cancer patients.

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